Zane Wilemon, Co-Founder of the Ubuntu Life Foundation. Helping children with special needs

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Zane Wilemon, Co-Founder of the Ubuntu Life Foundation, shares his personal story of self-discovery, faith and social entrepreneurship. Inspirational work helping children with special needs in Kenya.


In this episode we bring you a heart-warming interview with Zane Wilemon – an ordained priest from Texas who embraced social entrepreneurship in Kenya and improved the lives of children and women through philanthropy and commerce.


We hear how Zane’s philanthropic work led to the creation of Ubuntu Life, a successful social enterprise that is backed by social investors and whose products made it into Whole Foods and were recognised by Oprah Winfrey on her 2020 ‘Favorite Things List'.


Proceeds from the social enterprise go to the Ubuntu Life Foundation, whose work in Kenya supports children with special needs in education and health.


This episode highlights how anyone, anywhere, can make a positive difference to improve our world.


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About Zane Wilemon


After graduating from the University of Kansas and on the brink of enrolling in medical school, Zane found himself at a crossroads. Looking for an immediate and impactful way to help people in need, he traded his medical school applications for a one-way ticket to Kenya in 2000, and hasn’t looked back since.


Zane is an ordained priest in the Episcopal Church. He holds a Bachelor’s degree from the University of Kansas and a Master’s degree in Divinity from the Seminary of the Southwest. Zane has been featured on NPR and in the Huffington Post, Forbes, and other publications.


Zane currently resides in Austin with his wife Amal Safdar Wilemon and their rescue chihuahua, Biscuit.


The non-profit: Ubuntu Life Foundation


The social enterprise: Ubuntu Life